…So the stones cried out

Tags

, , , ,

…[The] created order in its entirety participated in the Savior’s Passion: the earth shook, the rocks were split, the whole cosmos shuddered (Matt. 27:51). In the words of St. Ephrem the Syrian, ‘humans were silent, so the stones cried out’. -Metroplitan Kallistos Ware

Advertisements

TWO ADAMS

Tags

,

We think that Paradise and Calvary,
Christ’s Cross and Adam’s Tree, stood in one place;
Look Lord and find both Adams met in me;
As the first Adam’s sweat surrounds my face,
May the last Adam’s blood my soul embrace.

– John Donne,
“Hymn to God, My God, In My Sickness”

Aidan Hart Sacred Icons

Thus it is written, “The first man, Adam, became a living being”; the last Adam became a life-giving spirit. But it is not the spiritual that is first, but the physical, and then the spiritual. The first man was from the earth, a man of dust; the second man is from heaven. As was the man of dust, so are those who are of the dust; and as is the man of heaven, so are those who are of heaven. Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we will also bear the image of the man of heaven. (1 Corinthians 15:45-49 NRSV).

MEDITATIONS ON LOVE

Tags

, , ,

“Let us always meet each other with smile, for the smile is the beginning of love.”
― Mother Teresa

“Go out into the world today and love the people you meet. Let your presence light new light in the hearts of people.”
― Mother Teresa

“Not all of us can do great things. But we can do small things with great love.”
― Mother Teresa

“I’m a little pencil in the hand of a writing God, who is sending a love letter to the world.”
― Mother Teresa

A Ceaseless Message Out of Silence

Tags

, , ,

Voices. Voices. Listen my heart, as only
saints have listened: until the gigantic call lifted them
off the ground; yet they kept on, impossibly,
kneeling and didn’t notice at all:
so complete was their listening. Not that you could
endure
God’s voice – far from it. But listen to the voice of the
wind
and the ceaseless message that forms itself out of silence.

-Rainer Maria Rilke, “Duino Elegies”
(photo: cover from The Jesus Prayer: The Ancient Desert Prayer that Tunes the Heart to God, by Frederica Mathewes-Green)

A Nun Tidies Up

Tags

,

“What is it then to be a fool for Christ? It is to control one’s thoughts when they stray out of line. It is to make the mind empty and free so as to be able to offer it in a state of readiness when Christ’s teachings are to be assimilated, swept clean for the words of God that it needs to welcome.”        -St. John Chrysostom

Moldovita Monastery
Cosmin Danila (Brasov, Romania)
Photographed September 2006, Bucovina, Romania

[source]

The Daily Grind, or God’s Majesty?

Tags

,

from THE QUOTIDIAN MYSTERIES: Laundry, Liturgy, and “Women’s Work”, by Kathleen Norris

The often heard lament, “I have so little time,” gives the lie to the delusion that the daily is of little significance.  Everyone has exactly the same amount of time, the same twenty-four hours in which many a weary voice has uttered the gospel truth: “Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof” (Mt. 6:34, KJV).

But most of us, most of the time, take for granted what is closest to us and is most universal.  The daily round of sunrise and sunset, for example, that marks the coming and passing of each day, is no longer a symbol of human hopes, or of God’s majesty, but a grind, something we must grit our teeth to endure.

Our busy schedules,

and even urban architecture, which all too often deprives us of a sense of the sky,

has diminished our capacity to marvel with the psalmist in the passage of time as an expression of God’s love for us and for all creation:

It was God who made the great lights,

whose love endures forever;

the sun to rule in the day,

whose love endures forever;

the moon and stars in the night,

whose love endures forever. (Ps. 136:7-9, GR)

My First Entry is about ENTRY

Tags

,

“The liturgy of the Eucharist is best understood as a journey or procession. It is the journey of the Church into the dimension of the Kingdom. We use the word ‘dimension’ because it seems the best way to indicate the manner of our sacramental entrance into the risen life of Christ. Color transparencies ‘come alive’ when viewed in three dimensions instead of two. The presence of the added dimension allows us to see much better the actual reality of what has been photographed. In very much the same way, though of course any analogy is condemned to fail, our entrance into the presence of Christ is an entrance into a fourth dimension which allows us to see the ultimate reality of life. It is not an escape from the world, rather it is the arrival at a vantage point from which we can see more deeply into the reality of the world.”
― Alexander SchmemannFor the Life of the World: Sacraments and Orthodoxy